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KSARA

0

Volume

150 cl

Grape Varieties

Cinsault and Carignan

About

The 1959 Clos St Alphonse by Château Ksara (then Caves de Ksara) is a blend of Cinsault and Carignan made by the Jesuits at time when Lebanon was still experiencing the teething pains of independence, hard-won in 1943.
One year earlier, after a political crisis threatened to destabilize the country, the US intervened militarily to restore the peace. It would herald 16 years of prosperity, a time in which Lebanon would acquire its reputation as the Switzerland of the Middle East.
This was probably of little concern to the Jesuits in the Bekaa Valley who, two years earlier, had celebrated 100 years of winemaking and who 14 years later would sell the winery to the current owners on the orders of Pope Paul VI. They were concerned with the land and the gift it gave so generously.
What of the ‘59 itself? At a recent tasting in the red fruit was still very present and the tannins still remarkably silky. Naturally, after 62 years, there are also more evolved flavors and aromas such as leather, tobacco, cigar box, cedar, earth and mushroom. The Jesuits, who still have a presence in the Bekaa Valley, would no doubt be very proud to hear it’s doing so well.

Volume

150 cl

Grape Varieties

Cinsault and Carignan

About

The 1959 Clos St Alphonse by Château Ksara (then Caves de Ksara) is a blend of Cinsault and Carignan made by the Jesuits at time when Lebanon was still experiencing the teething pains of independence, hard-won in 1943.
One year earlier, after a political crisis threatened to destabilize the country, the US intervened militarily to restore the peace. It would herald 16 years of prosperity, a time in which Lebanon would acquire its reputation as the Switzerland of the Middle East.
This was probably of little concern to the Jesuits in the Bekaa Valley who, two years earlier, had celebrated 100 years of winemaking and who 14 years later would sell the winery to the current owners on the orders of Pope Paul VI. They were concerned with the land and the gift it gave so generously.
What of the ‘59 itself? At a recent tasting in the red fruit was still very present and the tannins still remarkably silky. Naturally, after 62 years, there are also more evolved flavors and aromas such as leather, tobacco, cigar box, cedar, earth and mushroom. The Jesuits, who still have a presence in the Bekaa Valley, would no doubt be very proud to hear it’s doing so well.

Magnum Château 1959

LBP1,300,000

Volume

150 cl

Grape Varieties

Cinsault and Carignan

About

The 1959 Clos St Alphonse by Château Ksara (then Caves de Ksara) is a blend of Cinsault and Carignan made by the Jesuits at time when Lebanon was still experiencing the teething pains of independence, hard-won in 1943.
One year earlier, after a political crisis threatened to destabilize the country, the US intervened militarily to restore the peace. It would herald 16 years of prosperity, a time in which Lebanon would acquire its reputation as the Switzerland of the Middle East.
This was probably of little concern to the Jesuits in the Bekaa Valley who, two years earlier, had celebrated 100 years of winemaking and who 14 years later would sell the winery to the current owners on the orders of Pope Paul VI. They were concerned with the land and the gift it gave so generously.
What of the ‘59 itself? At a recent tasting in the red fruit was still very present and the tannins still remarkably silky. Naturally, after 62 years, there are also more evolved flavors and aromas such as leather, tobacco, cigar box, cedar, earth and mushroom. The Jesuits, who still have a presence in the Bekaa Valley, would no doubt be very proud to hear it’s doing so well.

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Volume

150 cl

Grape Varieties

Cinsault and Carignan

About

The 1959 Clos St Alphonse by Château Ksara (then Caves de Ksara) is a blend of Cinsault and Carignan made by the Jesuits at time when Lebanon was still experiencing the teething pains of independence, hard-won in 1943.
One year earlier, after a political crisis threatened to destabilize the country, the US intervened militarily to restore the peace. It would herald 16 years of prosperity, a time in which Lebanon would acquire its reputation as the Switzerland of the Middle East.
This was probably of little concern to the Jesuits in the Bekaa Valley who, two years earlier, had celebrated 100 years of winemaking and who 14 years later would sell the winery to the current owners on the orders of Pope Paul VI. They were concerned with the land and the gift it gave so generously.
What of the ‘59 itself? At a recent tasting in the red fruit was still very present and the tannins still remarkably silky. Naturally, after 62 years, there are also more evolved flavors and aromas such as leather, tobacco, cigar box, cedar, earth and mushroom. The Jesuits, who still have a presence in the Bekaa Valley, would no doubt be very proud to hear it’s doing so well.